isis unveiled: chapter chapter VIII (our place among infinities)

“The speculations of Plato, in the Banquet, on the creation of the primordial men, and the essay on Cosmogony in the Timaeus, must be taken allegorically, if we accept them at all. It is this hidden Pythagorean meaning in Timaeus, Cratylus, and Parmenides, and a few other trilogies and dialogues, that the Neo-platonists ventured to expound, as far as the theurgical vow of secrecy would allow them.

The Pythagorean doctrine that God is the universal mind diffused through all things, and the dogma of the soul’s immortality, are the leading features in these apparently incongruous teachings.

His piety and the great veneration Plato felt for the MYSTERIES, are sufficient warrant that he would not allow his indiscretion to get the better of that deep sense of responsibility which is felt by every adept.

“Constantly perfecting himself in perfect MYSTERIES, a man in them alone becomes truly perfect”, says he in the Phaedrus.

He took no pains to conceal his displeasure that the Mysteries had become less secret than formerly. Instead of profaning them by putting them within the reach of the multitude, he would have guarded them with jealous care against all but the most earnest and worthy of his disciples.

While mentioning the gods, on every page, his monotheism is unquestionable, for the whole thread of his discourse indicates that by the term gods he means a class of beings far lower in the scale than deities, and but one grade higher than men.

Even Josephus perceived and acknowledged this fact, despite the natural prejudice of his race. In his famous onslaught upon Apion, this historian says:

“Those, however, among the Greeks who philosophized in accordance with truth, were not ignorant of anything…nor did they fail to perceive the chilling superficialities of the mythical allegories, on which account they justly despised them….By which thing Plato, being moved, says it is not necessary to admit any one of the other poets into ‘the Commonwealth’, and he dismisses Homer blandly, after having crowned him and pouring unguent upon him, in order that indeed he should not destroy, by his myths, the orthodox belief respecting one God.””

H. P. Blavatsky

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