stanza 1, slokas 1-2

STANZA I.
1. THE ETERNAL PARENT WRAPPED IN HER EVER INVISIBLE ROBES HAD SLUMBERED ONCE AGAIN FOR SEVEN ETERNITIES.
2. TIME WAS NOT, FOR IT LAY ASLEEP IN THE INFINITE BOSOM OF DURATION.

 

“The President:  Is it correct to call it Mulaprakriti?

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  If you speak to a Hindu you will find that what a Vedantin calls Mulaprakriti is called Aditi in the Vedas. The Vedanta philosophy means, literally speaking, “the end of all knowledge.”

 
The great difficulty in studying the Hindu systems esoterically is that in India alone there are six schools of philosophy. Now if you analyze these you will find that they agree perfectly in substance.

 
Fundamentally they are identical;  but there is such a wealth of names, such a quantity of side issues, of all kinds of details and ornamentations; of sons being their own fathers, and fathers born from their own daughters, that you become lost in all this, as in a jungle.

 
State anything you will from the esoteric standpoint to a Hindu, and if he only wants to he can contradict and prove you in the wrong, from the standpoint of his own particular sectarian views, or the philosophy he accepts.

 
Each of the six schools of India has its own views and its own (to it) peculiar terms. So that, unless you hold strictly to some one school and say so, your special terminology is sure to be misunderstood.

 
It is nothing but splitting hairs, and quarreling about things that have no importance in reality.

 
Mr. Keightley:  Then the same term identically is used in quite a different sense by different philosophies: for instance Buddhi has one meaning in the esoteric philosophy, and a different meaning in the Sankhya?

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  And quite a different meaning again in the Vishnu Purana in which there are seven Prakritis that come from Mahat and the latter is called Maha-Buddhi.

 
Mr. Keightley:  That is again quite different.

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  No it is not; fundamentally it is perfectly the same thing, though in every philosophy you will have some other name and meaning given to it.

 
Mr. Kingsland:  Yet we must call it something. Are we to have our own terms?

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  I think the best you could do would be to coin new English words. If you want to ever become Western philosophers, you had better not take from the Hindus, who will be the first ones to say: “Behold, these Europeans! They take from us all they can, disfigure everything and do no good.”

 
Find equivalents for all these terms, coin new English words, and do not depart from them; and there will be no confusion.”

 

H. P. Blavatsky

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s