isis unveiled: chapter xiv (ancient mysteries)

“If now we turn to navigation, we will find ourselves able to prove, on good authorities, that Necho II., fitted out a fleet on the Red Sea and dispatched it for exploration. The fleet was absent above two years and instead of returning through the Straits of Babelmandeb, as was wont, sailed back through the Straits of Gibraltar.

Herodotus was not at all swift to concede to the Egyptians a maritime achievement so vast as this. They had, he says, been spreading the report that “returning homewards, they had the sunrise on their right hands; a thing to me which is incredible.” “And yet”, remarks the author of the heretofore-mentioned article, “this incredible assertion is now proved incontestable, as may well be understood by anyone who has doubled the Cape of Good Hope.”  Thus, it proved that the most ancient of these performed a feat which was attributed to Columbus many ages later. They say they anchored twice on their way; sowed corn, reaped it and, steered in triumph through the Pillars of Hercules and eastward toward the Mediterranean.

“There was a people”, he adds, “much more deserving of the term ‘veteres’ than the Romans and Greeks. The Greeks, young in their knowledge, sounded a trumpet before these and called upon all the world to admire their ability. Old Egypt, grown gray in her wisdom, was so secure of her acquirements that she did not invite admiration and cared no more for the opinion of the flippant Greek than we do today for that of a Feejee islander.” “O Solon, Solon”, said the oldest Egyptian priest to that sage. “You Greeks are ever childish, having no ancient opinion, no discipline of any long standing!”

And very much surprised, indeed, was the great Solon, when he was told by the priest of Egypt that so many gods and goddesses of the Grecian Pantheon were but the disguised gods of Egypt. Truly spoke Zonoras: “All these things came to us from Chaldea to Egypt; and from thence were derived to the Greeks.””

H. P. Blavatsky

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