stanza 1, slokas 1-2

STANZA I.
1. THE ETERNAL PARENT WRAPPED IN HER EVER INVISIBLE ROBES HAD SLUMBERED ONCE AGAIN FOR SEVEN ETERNITIES.
2. TIME WAS NOT, FOR IT LAY ASLEEP IN THE INFINITE BOSOM OF DURATION.

 

“Mr. Keightley:  You touched upon a question that is put here. Time and space in modern philosophy are conceived of, as you said, simply as forms of the human physical brain, and as having no existence apart from human intellect, as we know it.

 
Thence arises this old question:  “We can conceive of no matter that is not extended” (in consequence of that faculty or that peculiarity of mental faculty), “no extension that is not extension of something.

 
Is it the same on the higher planes, and if so, what is the substance that fills absolute space, and is identical with that space?” You see, that brings to a focus the question.

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  “Is it the same on another plane?” Now how can I answer your query? I never traveled in absolute space, as far as I know. All I can give you, is simply the speculations of those who had a thousand times more brain than I, or any of you have. Some of you would call them vagaries. We don’t.

 
Mr. Ellis:  Does not he answer his own question in the question itself?

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  How?

 
Mr. Ellis:  He presupposes that that is the only way in which the intellect can think.

 
Mr. Keightley:  I say on this plane our intellect is limited. In this way we only conceive of matter extended.

 
Mr. Ellis:  If your soul or anything else could conceive, we will imagine for a moment, in another form. You cannot get an answer in words to that, can you?

 
Your intellect has to understand those words. Therefore intellect, not being able to conceive in any other way, cannot get an answer in any other way.

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  On this very same plane, there are not only the intellects of men. There are other intellects, and intelligences, call them whatever you like.

 
The minds of animals, from the highest to the lowest, from elephant down to ant. I can assure you that the ant has in relation to its own plane just as good an intellect as we have.

 
If it cannot express to us in words, it yet shows high reasoning powers, besides and above instinct, as we all know.

 
Thus finding on this plane of ours so many and such varied states of consciousness and intelligences, we have no right to take into consideration or account only our own human consciousness, as though there were no other.

 
Nor can we, beyond accepting it as fact, presume to decide how far animal and insect consciousness goes.

 
Mr. R. Hall:  Why not? Natural science can find it out.

 
Mme. Blavatsky:  No, it cannot. It can speculate and guess but will never be able with its present methods to acquire any certitude for such speculation.

 
If Sir John Lubbock could become an ant for awhile, and think as an ant, and remember it when returning to his own sphere of consciousness then would he know something for certain; not otherwise.”

 

H. P. Blavatsky

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